Understanding key color skin malignancy trends for prevention and treatment

October 08, 2022

1 minute read

Source/Disclosures

Source:

Rzepecki A, et al. Keratinocytic carcinoma resected by Mohs micrographic surgery in individuals with colored skin: An observational study. Presented at the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Annual Meeting; October 6-10, 2022; Denver.

Disclosures:
Rzepecki does not report any relevant financial information.


We have not been able to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact [email protected]

DENVER — People with colored skin are more likely to have pigmented basal cell carcinoma and to develop keratinocyte carcinoma at a younger age than non-Hispanic white people, according to a study presented here.

“Despite the lower frequency of keratinocytic carcinomas, people with skin of color experience disproportionately higher morbidity and mortality than non-Hispanic white individuals, even when the malignancies are diagnosed at the same stage,” alexandra Rzepeckidoctor, chief resident at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, said during her presentation at the annual meeting of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery.

DERM0721Alexis_ITJ_Graphic_01

People with colored skin are more likely to have pigmented basal cell carcinoma and to develop keratinocyte carcinoma at a younger age than non-Hispanic white people.

Researchers conducted a retrospective study of electronic medical records to identify 94 skin-colored and 130 non-Hispanic white patients with primary basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma resected by Mohs micrographic surgery.

Skin-colored people with keratinocyte carcinoma did so at an average age of 58.5 years, compared to an average age of 72 for non-Hispanic white patients and 71 for Hispanic patients.

Tumors in high-risk locations occurred in 52.4% of colored patients versus 43% of white patients. This number, although higher, was not statistically significant.

Additionally, pigmented subtypes of basal cell carcinoma occurred in 33% of patients with colored skin, compared to only 3% of white individuals.

Right-sided tumors occurred in 90% of black individuals, compared with 51.2% of non-Hispanic white individuals.

“In side-by-side comparisons, pigmented basal cells were 18 times more likely to occur in skin of color compared to white individuals and more than 15 times more likely in Hispanics than white individuals,” Rzepecki said.

In situ squamous cells occurred more frequently in people with colored and Hispanic skin, while invasive squamous cells appeared more frequently in white patients than in those with colored skin.

“Understanding the characteristics of malignant skin tumors in people with skin color — a growing and at-risk population — is critical for developing prevention and treatment strategies to improve outcomes,” Rzepecki said. “Our results are an important addition to the limited literature characterizing the skin of individuals of color undergoing a Mohs for non-melanoma skin cancer.”